GovContracts · GovTest · GovIT · GovLab · GovMedical

Are you ready for the new realities of contracting?

Although 2012 IT budgets survived this fiscal year’s meat grinder mostly intact, the government’s emphases are changing. Agencies want to rebalance the spend, with less going to operations and maintenance — infrastructure, that is — and correspondingly more to solutions for improved mission-delivery with the metrics to prove value.

In this four-part series, we’ll look at the new realities affecting federal IT in the near term, how those realities affect government missions and technology, and how government will work with the vendor community.

Let’s start with a look at the government’s three top technology themes. The first is getting value from “big data.” The second is enabling government workers to be more mobile—and dealing with the fact that most workers have three to five mobile devices. Security is the third theme, underlying all government IT initiatives.

Cutting cost and risk
The focus on costs is not so much in the budget as it is in policies and practices from the agency regulatory and oversight communities. These policies are shifting risk away from the government and onto contractors. It’s less “buyer beware” and more “contractor beware.”

Here’s what’s happening on the cost front:

Defective parts: The Missile Defense Agency recently put out a solicitation for development of ground-based missile development and sustainment. It includes a new type of clause called a “Contractor Accountability for Quality.” It lets the agency cut or totally withhold performance fees for bad parts or failure by the contractor to use best practices. Look for more attempts to put open-ended liability on the contractor.

Reimbursable contractor salaries: The 2012 Defense Authorization Bill extended the lid on contractor salaries that the government will pay for under cost-reimbursement contracts from the top few executives in a company to all employees connected with a contract.

Firm, fixed-price contracts: The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council etched into regulation the Office of Federal Procurement Policy’s desire (and the GAO’s recommendation) for greater use of contracts that put all the burden on the contractor to deliver to the government’s satisfaction when acquiring commercial services.

Tightening up on use of interagency contracts: The FAR Council is implementing a provision in the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Bill of 2009. It requires written justification and determination that the vehicle chosen represents the “best procurement approach” of all interagency contracts available. 

Although 2012 IT budgets survived this fiscal year’s meat grinder mostly intact, the government’s emphases are changing. Agencies want to rebalance the spend, with less going to operations and maintenance — infrastructure, that is — and correspondingly more to solutions for improved mission-delivery with the metrics to prove value.

In this four-part series, we’ll look at the new realities affecting federal IT in the near term, how those realities affect government missions and technology, and how government will work with the vendor community.

Let’s start with a look at the government’s three top technology themes. The first is getting value from “big data.” The second is enabling government workers to be more mobile—and dealing with the fact that most workers have three to five mobile devices. Security is the third theme, underlying all government IT initiatives.

Cutting cost and risk
The focus on costs is not so much in the budget as it is in policies and practices from the agency regulatory and oversight communities. These policies are shifting risk away from the government and onto contractors. It’s less “buyer beware” and more “contractor beware.”

Full article by Steve Charles, Washington Technology

Share this

  • RSS
  • email
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us

Travis Wheeler works in marketing at Technical Communities, the leading GSA sales and marketing partner for technology companies.

22 comments

  1. herman August 22nd, 2014 at 9:19 pm

    .

    благодарствую!!…

  2. Ronald August 23rd, 2014 at 12:39 am

    .

    thanks….

  3. Joey August 26th, 2014 at 2:41 pm

    .

    thanks!…

  4. Walter August 26th, 2014 at 4:41 pm

    .

    спс….

  5. cameron November 19th, 2014 at 9:17 am

    .

    hello!…

  6. lynn November 23rd, 2014 at 5:24 am

    .

    ñïñ çà èíôó….

  7. Ernesto November 23rd, 2014 at 9:26 am

    .

    áëàãîäàðñòâóþ!…

  8. Angel November 23rd, 2014 at 9:55 pm

    .

    áëàãîäàðþ….

  9. Willie November 26th, 2014 at 10:19 am

    .

    áëàãîäàðåí!!…

  10. Wade November 28th, 2014 at 6:43 am

    .

    tnx for info!!…

  11. russell December 4th, 2014 at 5:54 am

    .

    ñïñ!…

  12. dan December 5th, 2014 at 4:52 pm

    .

    ñïñ çà èíôó!…

  13. Gregory December 5th, 2014 at 5:25 pm

    .

    good info!…

  14. martin December 18th, 2014 at 2:38 am

    .

    ñïñ!…

  15. Kenneth December 20th, 2014 at 5:42 pm

    .

    áëàãîäàðåí….

  16. Aaron December 21st, 2014 at 9:27 am

    .

    thank you!…

  17. Trevor December 26th, 2014 at 10:07 am

    .

    thanks….

  18. philip January 22nd, 2015 at 6:53 pm

    .

    ñïñ çà èíôó!…

  19. Ray January 30th, 2015 at 6:56 am

    .

    ñïñ!!…

  20. cody February 4th, 2015 at 10:12 pm

    .

    thank you!!…

  21. Leonard February 10th, 2015 at 7:51 am

    .

    tnx….

  22. george February 14th, 2015 at 9:15 am

    .

    thank you….

Add your comments